Beam Me Up: National Geographic’s Star Trek Adventure

National_Geographic_Star_Trek_The_Official_Guide_to_Our_Universe_The_True_Science_Behind_the_Starship_Voyages

When I was asked to be the “Trekkie research expert” on this beautiful book by Andrew Fazekas, I almost laughed. Not because it was all that funny – it was one of the more awesome job offers I’ve received – but because I had watched precisely one movie and two episodes, tops.  To say I felt out of my depth is being kind.

Luckily it wasn’t anything a weeks-long Star Trek marathon, the excellent-and-sometimes-frightening Star Trek wiki, and a lot of science research couldn’t fix. I wouldn’t say I became a Trekkie, but editing and researching parts of this book taught me a huge number of interesting things. First, that Spock is kind of sexy. Second, that space in kind of sexy. Third, that no one’s going to have the technology to beam me up anytime soon.

This book gives readers an in-depth glimpse at the night sky through the visionary lens of Star Trek. It’s equal parts astrological exploration, night sky field guide, and fun guide through the Star Trek universe’s facts and fictions. It’ll tell you what Star Trek technologies we’re close to mastering in real life. It’ll illustrate the space’s most fascinating phenomena through the eyes of both science and Captain Kirk. In short, it offers something really cool to both science geeks and Trekkie enthusiasts.

I may not be a Trekkie, even now, but I’m incredibly grateful to have spent time in that world. And for the ability to hold an hour-long conversation with a Trekkie at a Halloween party and trick him into believing that I’m a \member of the club.

Enter the Beyond: Nat Geo’s Are We Alone?

2003972In the last six months, my editorial life has been dominated by the cosmos. I’ve explored images of theoretical white holes; contemplated the nature of time and whether we can travel through it; learned about volcanic moons and potential life on planets other than our own. Enter National Geographic’s Are We Alone? and Other Mysteries of Space. Managing this project was a lot of fun, and really pushed my knowledge of what we know–and how much we still don’t know–about our universe and beyond.